Language Literature proverb proverbio

Italian Proverbs

An in depth record of Italian proverbs in Italian and translated into English with e-book references.

Well-liked Italian Proverbs

A

  • A cane scottato l ‘acqua fredda pare calda.
  • A chi bene crede, Dio provvede.
    • English equal: God listens to those that have faith/ Have faith and God shall provide.

– A chi= these/them/generalising. Bene crede=good religion, respectable faith, genuinely. Dio= God provvede=offers.

    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 873. ISBN 0415096243.
  • A chi parla poco, gli basta la metà del cervello.
    • English equal: Least stated, soonest mended.
    • “In private animosities and verbal contentions, where angry passions are apt to rise, and irritating, if not profane expressions are often made use of – the least said, the better in general. By multiplying words, cases often grow worse instead of better.”
    • Source for which means of English equivalentPorter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order …. Munroe and Company. pp. 125.
    • Emanuel Strauss (1994). “1383”. Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. II. Routledge. p. 1053. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6.
  • A chi vuole, non mancano modi.
  • A mali estremi, estremi rimedi.
    • English equal: Desperate occasions call for determined measures.
    • “Drastic action is called for – and justified – when you find yourself in a particularly difficult situation.”
    • Source for which means of English equal: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Information on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 53. ISBN 978-Zero-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 10 August 2013.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). “797”. Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. II. Routledge. p. 687. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6. Retrieved on 27 November 2013.
  • A goccia a goccia s’incava la pietra.
    • English equal: Constant dropping wears away the stone.
    • “A drop hollows out the stone by falling not twice, but many times; so too is a person made wise by reading not two, but many books.”
    • (Giordano Bruno, Il Candelaio)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 187. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Advert ogni pazzo piace il suon del suo sonaglio.
    • English equivalentː Every fool is happy together with his own folly.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). “147”. Dictionary of European Proverbs. I. Routledge. p. 139. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7.
  • Ad ogni uccello il proprio nido è bello.
    • English equal: The hen loves her personal nest.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). “923”. Dictionary of European Proverbs. II. Routledge. p. 776. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7.
  • Agguingere legno al fuoco.
  • Al buon vino non bisogna frasca.
  • Al piu potente ceda il più prudente.
  • Alla buona derrata, pensaci su.
  • Anche il pazzo cube talvolta parole da savio.
    • English equivalent: Even a idiot might give a sensible man counsel.
    • “Even as the fingers of the two hands are equal, so are human beings equal to one another. No one has any right, nor any preference to claim over another. You are brothers.”
    • Muhammad, The Final Sermon of Muhammad delivered on the Ninth Day of Dhul Hijjah 10 A.H (c. 630 AD)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 40. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Anche il sole passa sopra il fango, e non s’imbratta.
    • Translation: The sun passes over filth and is not defiled.
    • Italian proverb, quoted in Proverbs, Maxims and Phrases of All Ages : Categorised Subjectively and Arranged Alphabetically (1887) by Robert Christy, p. 322.
  • Anche in paradiso non è bello essere soli.
    • English equivalent: Even in paradise it isn’t good to be alone.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1106. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Amare e non essere amato, quanto risponde sens esser chiamato. To love and be liked as it’s meant to be
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 676. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Amicizia di signore non è retaggio; chi troppo se ne fida non è saggio.
    • English equivalent: A king’s favour is not any inheritance.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 24. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Amor, tosse e fumo, malemente si nascondono.
    • English equal: Love, smoke and cough are arduous to hide.
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations. W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue). p. 50.
  • Amor tutti eguaglia.
    • English equal: Love makes all equal.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 767. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Anche la legna storta dà fuoco diritto.
    • English equal: Crooked logs make straight fires.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 683. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Andara a Roma senza vedere il papa.’”
  • A caval donato non si guarda in bocca.
    • English equivalent: Look not a gift horse within the mouth.
    • “And so with respect to gifts and donations in general, whether their value be more or less, they should be accounted tokens of kindness and received with promptness and cordiality.”
    • Source for which means: Porter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Organized in Alphabetical Order …. Munroe and Company. p. 127.
    • Supply: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 52. ISBN 0415160502.
  • A carne di lupo, zanne di cane.
    • English equal: You should meet roughness with roughness.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 12. ISBN 0415160502.
  • A chi dai il dito si prende anche il braccio.
    • Translation: Give them a finger they usually’ll
    • English equal: Give an inch they usually’ll take a mile.
    • Supply: Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 828. ISBN 0415096243.
  • A chi Dio vuol castigare leva il cervello.
    • English equivalent: Whom God will destroy, he first make mad.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 841. ISBN 0415096243.
  • A torto si lagna del mare chi due volte ci vuol tornare.
    • English equivalent: He complains wrongfully on the sea that endure shipwreck twice.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 898. ISBN 0415096243.

English equivalent: Help yourself, and God will enable you to.

    • “When in trouble first of all every one himself should do his best to improve his condition.”
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 150. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.
    • Maurus (2002). Nella sofferenza aiutati che Dio ti aiuta. Segno. ISBN 8872826551.
  • Al confessore, medico e avvocato, non tenere il ver celato.
    • English equal: Conceal not the reality from thy physcian and lawyer.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 666. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Assai pampini e poca uva.
    • English equal: He that promises an excessive amount of means nothing.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 92. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Aspetta, caval, che l’erba cresca.
    • English equivalent: Whereas the grass grows the steed starves.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1228. ISBN 0415096243.

B

  • Batti il ferro finché è caldo.
    • Translation: Strike while the iron is scorching.
    • Sabopak (1997). Battere il ferro finchéècaldo. Gruppo Editoriale Tipografico. ISBN 8887189005.
  • Bella Cosa tosto è rapita.
  • Bella in vista, dentro è trista.
    • English equal: A good face and a foul coronary heart.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 35. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Ben finisce chi considera il positive.
    • Translation: He ends nicely who considers the top.
    • English equivalent: Whatever you do, act correctly, and contemplate the top.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 600. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Bisogna accomodarsi ai tempi.
    • English equivalent: Gnaw the bone which is fallen to thy lot.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 865. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Bisogna che si levi di buon’ora chi desidera piacere a tutti.
  • Bisogna prima pensare e poi fare.
    • English equal: A closed mouth catches no flies.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 751. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Bisogna rischiare la scardola per avere il salmone.
    • Translation: Who needs to win a gander, you should weigh Drake.
    • English equivalent: Set a herring to catch a whale.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1134. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Bisogna saper afferrare l’occasione pei capelli.
    • English equivalent: Alternative knocks solely once.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 400. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Bocca di miele, cuore di fiele.
    • English equal: A honey tongue and a heart of gall.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 108. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Buon principio fa buon effective.
    • English equal: An excellent beginning makes a very good ending; Properly begun, is half achieved.
    • Which means: Starting correctly ensures the speedy completion of a course of. A – starting is usually blocked by a number of obstacles (potential obstacles) the removing of which may ensure the graceful course of the process.
    • Source for proverb: Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 24. ISBN 0415160502.
    • Source for which means: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 228. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.
  • Buon seme dà buoni frutti.
    • Translation: Good tree makes good fruit.
    • English equivalent: The fruit of a great tree can also be good.
    • Which means: Good mother and father will make good youngsters as a consequence of instance followed intently and every day.
    • Giuseppe Catenacci (1967). L’avvocato in paradiso. Gastaldi. p. 259. Retrieved on 9 June 2013.

C

  • È meglio qualche cosa che niente
    • English equivalent: Higher an egg as we speak than a hen tomorrow.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 75. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Can che abbaia non morde.
    • Translation: The canine that barks doesn’t chew.
    • English equivalent: Barking canine seldom chew.
    • Which means: People who make the most or the loudest threats are the least more likely to take motion.
    • Supply for which means: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Information on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 17. ISBN 978-Zero-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 20 June 2013.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 146. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Camminare sopra il filo di un rasoio.
    • English equal: Don’t play with edged tools.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 716. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Carta canta.
    • English equivalent: If the beard have been all, the goat may preach.
    • Which means: Mere formal indicators of being an authority does not make you one.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 117. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Cavallo riscaldato, (e garzon ritornato), non fu mai buono.
    • English equal: Take heed of enemies reconciled and of meat twice boiled.
    • Which means: Your former enemies may cunningly take revenge on you just out of spite.; Trust not a reconciled enemy greater than an open foe.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 25. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Chiave d’oro apre ogni porta.
  • Chi affoga s’attaccherrebbe alle funi del cielo
    • English equivalent: A drowning man plucks at a straw.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 33. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Chi ama me, ama il mio cane.
    • Translation: Whoever loves me, loves my dog.
    • English equivalent: Love me, love my canine.
    • Which means: Should you love somebody, you will nearly like every part about him.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 953. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Chi aspettar suole, ha ciò che vuole.
    • English equal. He that may have endurance can have what he will.
    • Other English equal: Endurance is a remedy for each sorrow.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 87. ISBN 0415160502.
    • Chi ben commincia è meta dell’opra.
    • Translation: Who nicely begins, is half approach via his process.
    • Which means. Having made the correct preparations when beginning a challenge will save you a number of time.
    • Carlo Goldoni, Il filosofo di campagna (The Country Thinker) (1752), Half II, scene I (translation by Lesbina); reported in Thomas Benfield Harbottle and Philip Hugh Dalbiac, Dictionary of Quotations (French and Italian) (1904), p. 261.
  • Chi da se stesso può fare alcuna cosa, non aspetti che altri la faccia.
    • Translation: Who by himself can do something, don’t anticipate others to do.
    • English equivalent: For what thou canst do thyself, rely not on one other.
    • Latin equal: Ne quid expectes amicos, quod tute agere possis.
      • Translation: Anticipate nothing from buddies, do what you are able to do your self.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 600. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Chi di gallina nasce, convien che razzoli.
    • Translation: Because the abbot sings, so the sacristan responds.
    • Which means: Youngsters will grow to be like older generations.
    • Supply: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 138. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Chi di gatta nasce, sorci piglia.
    • English equal: What is bred within the bone won’t go out of the flesh.
    • Which means: You possibly can seldom change human nature with the help of logic.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 985. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Chi disordani da giovane se ne pente da vecchio.
    • English equivalent: They who can be young when they are previous have to be previous when they’re young.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). “1605”. Dictionary of European proverbs. II. Routledge. p. 1151. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Chi due lepri caccia, l’una non piglia, e l’altra lascia.
    • English equivalent: You need to not run after two hares on the similar time.
    • Which means: “Concentrate on one thing at a time or you will achieve nothing. – Trying to do two or more things at a time, when even one on its own needs full effort, means that none of them will be accomplished properly.”
    • Supply for which means of English equivalent: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). “X”. European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. X. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.
    • ** Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 102.
  • ‘’Chi ha bisogna s’arrenda.’’
  • Chi ha capo di cera non vada al sole.
    • Translation: Who has a head of wax should not be in the sunshine.
    • English equal: He that hath a head of wax must not stroll in the sun.
    • Which means: Know your limitations and weaknesses; Don’t do one thing that’s positive to wreck you.
    • Ward, Caroline (1842). Nationwide proverbs within the principal languages of Europe. J.W. Parker. p. 54.
  • Chi ha fatto il mala, faccia la penitenza.
  • Chi ha fatto il male, faccia la penitenza.
    • Translation: What you reap is what you sow.
    • Strauss (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 394. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Chi ha più giudizio più n’adoperi.
    • Translation: To whom a lot is entrusted, much is required.
    • English equivalent: Everyone to whom much is given, much is predicted.
    • Which means: “More is expected of those who have received more – that is, those who had good fortune, are naturally gifted, or have been shown special favour.”
    • Supply for which means and proverbs: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Information on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 75. ISBN 978-Zero-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 8 September 2013.** Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1095. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Chi ha una retta coscienza possiede un regno.
    • English equal: His own want leads every man.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 977. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Chi he sano e da pie del Sultano.
    • English equivalent: Good well being is above wealth.
    • “What shall it profit a man if he gains the whole world-and loses his health?”
    • Dale Carnegie, The right way to Stop Worrying and Begin Dwelling (1948)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 879. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Chi ha nome, ha robe
    • English equal: A superb identify is the perfect of all treasures.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 58. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Chi da giovane ha un vizio, in vecchiaia fa sempre quell’uffizio.
    • Translation: Previous habits die arduous.
    • Supply: Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 1122. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Chi dorme non piglia pesci.
    • Translation: Those who sleep don’t catch any fish.
    • English equal: Early to mattress and early to rise, makes a person wholesome, wealthy and sensible.
    • Which means: “A lifestyle that involves neither staying up late nor sleeping late is good for body and mind and leads to financial success.”
    • Source for which means of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Details on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 70. ISBN 978-Zero-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 5 September 2013.
    • Strauss (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 147. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Chi due lepri caccia, l’una non piglia e l’altra lascia.
    • English equivalent: Grasp all, lose all
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 886. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Chi fa da sé, fa per tre.
    • Translation: He who works by himself does the work of three (individuals).
    • English equal: If you need something achieved proper, do it yourself.
    • Notice: sarcastically contradicted by: “L’unione fa la forza” (“Union produces might.”)
    • Boerio, Manin (1829). Dizionario del dialetto veneziano. A. Santini. p. 13.
  • Chi lascia la by way of vecchia per la nuova, sa quel che lascia, ma non sa quel che trova.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 638. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Chi mal pensa, mal abbia.
    • English equivalent: Shame take him that disgrace thinketh.
    • Which means: Don’t assume evil of others since they more than likely act the best way they do because of situational elements: Never attribute something to malice which may adequately be explained by stupidity.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. entry 806. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Chi male comincia, peggio finisce.
    • English equivalent: A nasty beginning makes a nasty ending.
    • Which means: “It is as impossible that a system radically erroneous, once commenced, should end well, as it is that a mathematical problem, commenced wrong, should come out right.”
    • Supply for which means: William Henry Porter (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order …. Munroe and Firm. p. 202.
    • Emanuel Strauss (1994). “1”. Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 1. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6.
  • Chi non è meco, è contro a meco.
  • Chi non fa quando può, non fa quando vuole.
    • English equivalent: He that will not when he might, when he will he might have nay.
    • Which means: “Take advantage of an opportunity when it presents itself, even if you do not want or need it at the time, because it may no longer be available when you do.”
    • Supply for which means of English equivalent:Martin H. Manser (2007). The Details on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 120. ISBN 978-Zero-8160-6673-5.
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations. W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue). p. 41.
  • Chi non può fare come vuole, faccia come può.
    • English equal: Do as chances are you’ll, when you can’t do as you may.
    • “Now you can’t have it you want it!”
    • Mitchell Hurwitz, Arrested Improvement (2003-2006)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 707. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Chi non sa obbedir, non sa comandar.
    • Translation: He who has not obeyed, can’t command.
    • English equivalent: Who has not served can’t command.
    • Which means: One should have been managed in the identical state of affairs one wishes to properly control others.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 855. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Chi non si lascia consigliare, no si può aiutare.
    • Translation: He who can’t be suggested, may also not be helped.
    • English equivalent: He that will not be endorsed can’t be helped.
    • It’s all the time a silly thing to provide recommendation, but to offer good advice is completely deadly.
    • The Portrait Of Mr. W. H. (1889), p. 5.
    • Which means: Recommendation typically include a real warning or an effective suggestion, which is unprudent not to take into accounts.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 964. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Chi non tura bucolia, tera bucape.
  • Chi mal pensa, mal abbia.
    • English equal: Shame take him that disgrace thinketh.
    • Which means: Don’t assume evil of others since they more than likely act the best way they do because of situational elements: By no means attribute one thing to malice which may adequately be explained by stupidity.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. entry 806. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Chi non ha danari in borsa, abbia miel in bocca.
    • Translation: He who has no money within the purse should have honey within the mouth
    • English equivalent: You’ll be able to catch extra flies with a drop of honey than with a barrel of vinegar.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 100.
  • Chi parla assai, falla spesso.
  • Chi presto denta, presto sdenta.
    • Translation: Those who quickly inquire, soon get previous.
    • English equal: Curiosity killed the cat.
    • Which means: “Inquisitiveness – or a desire to find about something – can lead you into trouble.”
    • Source for which means of English equal: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Information on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 49. ISBN 978-Zero-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 9 August 2013.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 684. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Chi ruba poco, ruba assai.
    • English equal: He that steals an egg will steal an ox.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 962. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Chi ruba una volta è sempre ladro.
    • English equal: As soon as a drunkard all the time a drunkard; As soon as a thief all the time a thief.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 771. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Chi si pasce di speranza, fa la fresca danza
    • English equal: He that lives on hope will die fasting.
    • Which means: “Do not pin all your hopes on something you may not attain, because you could up with end nothing.”
    • Source for which means of English equivalent:Martin H. Manser (2007). The Information on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 120. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 952. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Chi sta bene non si muove.
    • English equal: ”Better is the enemy of excellent.”
    • Which means: The goal for perfection or mastery may slow down progress.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 166. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Chi sta alle scolte, sente le sue colpe.
    • English equivalent: Eavesdroppers hear no good of themselves.
    • Which means: “People who eavesdrop on the conversations of others risk hearing unfavorable comments about themselves; used as a warning or reprimand.”
    • Source for which means of English equal: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Details on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 171. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). “250”. Dictionary of European Proverbs. I. Routledge. p. 238. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7.
  • Chi tardi arriva, male allogia.
  • Chi tosto giudica, tosto si pente.
    • Translation: Who judges quickly, soon repents.
    • English equal: Hasty judgment leads to repentance.
    • Which means: A quick evaluation is a terrible analysis.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 196. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Chi vuol arricchire in un anno, è impiccato in sei mesi.
    • English equivalent: No one gets wealthy shortly if he is trustworthy.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 963. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Chi vuol dir mal d’altrui, pensi prima a sè stesso.
  • Chi vuol gastigar un villano, lo dia a gastigar ad un altro.
  • Chi vuol’ mangiar col diavolo bisogna aver cucchiaio lungo.
    • Translation: He who sups with the satan should use an extended spoon.
    • Which means: Somebody who treats others badly will ultimately activate you.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 920. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Chi vuol pigliare uccelli non deve trar loro dietro randelli.
    • English equal: Deal gently with the chook you imply to catch.
    • When individuals are just, they need friendship in addition.
    • Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (c. 325 BC), Ebook VIII, 1155.a26
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 689. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Chi vuol saldar pinga non la maneggia.
  • Ciò che Dio fa è ben fatto.
    • English equivalent: Every day brings it personal bread.
    • Which means: Attempt to not worry a lot concerning the future.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 757. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Ciò che e rimasto ha sapore piu dolce.
    • English equal: The sweetest flesh is close to the bones.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). “1666”. Dictionary of European proverbs. II. Routledge. p. 1176. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Con la pazienza s’acquista scienza.
    • Translation: With endurance you transcend information.
    • English equivalent: An oz of endurance is value a pound of brains.
    • Which means: Endurance can typically do more than your wits.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 415. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Con nulla non si fa nulla.
    • English equal: From nothing, nothing can come.
  • In the event you hold doing what you’ve all the time achieved, you’ll hold getting what you’ve all the time gotten.
    • Neil Strauss, The Recreation (2005).
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 238. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Comprare una gatta nel sacco.
    • English equal: Let the customer have a thousand eyes for the seller needs just one.
    • “I formulate my law, which was wrung out of me after twenty years of wearying defense of science fiction against attacks of people who used the worst examples of the field for ammunition, and whose conclusion was that ninety percent of SF is crud. Using the same standards that categorize 90% of science fiction as trash, crud, or crap, it can be argued that 90% of film, literature, consumer goods, e.tc is crap.”
    • Theodore Sturgeon Venture (1957)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1101. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Come la cosa indugia, piglia vizio.
    • Translation: As it lingers, so it rakes peril.
    • English equivalent: There’s hazard in delay.
    • Which means: “Hesitation or procastination may lead to trouble or disaster.”
    • Supply for which means of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Details on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 53. ISBN 978-Zero-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 10 August 2013.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 695. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Contro i difetti del vicin t’adiri, e gli stessi difetti in te non miri.
    • English equivalent: Overlook other faults remembering your personal; Forgive and overlook.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 838. ISBN 0415096243.

D

  • Da chi mi fido, mi guardi Dio, da chi non mi fido guarderò io.
    • Translation: Let God shield me from these I trust, I’ll shield myself from those I don’t.
    • English equal: A mans worst enemies are sometimes those of his personal house.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 52. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Da colpa nasce colpa
    • English equal: Deep calls to deep.
    • “The more of the context of a problem that a scientist can comprehend, the greater are his chances of finding a truly adequate solution.”
    • Russell L. Ackoff, The event of operations research as a science (1956)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 695. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Dai cattivi costumi nascono le buone leggi.
    • English equal: Good legal guidelines have sprung from dangerous customs.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 879. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Dal frutto si conosce l’albero.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall removed from the tree.
    • Which means: Youngsters observe day by day and — in their behaviour — typically comply with the example of their mother and father.
    • Supply for which means: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 488. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Dal riso molto conosci lo stolto.
    • English equal: A fool is ever laughing.
    • Emanuel Strauss (1994). “137”. Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 102. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6.
  • Dare il diavolo ciò che gli spetta.fe meglio
  • Di buona volontà sta pieno l’inferno.
    • Translation: The street to hell is paved with good intentions.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 257. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Dimmi con chi vai, e te dirò chi sei.
  • Dio mi guardi da chi studia un libro solo.
    • English equal: Worry the man of 1 e-book.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 851. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Dolor comunicato è subito scemato.
    • English equal: A problem shared is a problem halved.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 351. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Doni di nemici non sono doni.
    • Translation: Presents of enemies are not any presents.
    • Observe: “This advice has its root in the story of the Trojan Horse, the treacherous subterfuge by which the Greeks finally overcame their trojan adversaries at the end of the Trojan War.”
    • English equivalent: Beware of Greeks bearing presents.
    • Which means: “Do not trust gifts or favors if they come from an enemy.”
    • Source for which means: Martin H. Manser; David H. Pickering (2003). The Details On File Dictionary of Classical and Biblical Allusions. Infobase Publishing. p. 46. ISBN 978-0-8160-4868-7. Retrieved on 1 July 2013.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 855. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Dopo il cattivo, viene il bel tempo.
  • Du stagione tutto.
    • English equal: Man proposes, God disposes.
    • “Plans are insulted destinies. I don’t have plans, I only have goals.”
    • Ash Chandler, Freudian Slip, Mumbai Mirror Buzz, April 2006.
    • Caroline Ward (1842). Nationwide Proverbs in the Principal Languages of Europe. J.W. Parker. p. 29.

E

  • È il tono che fa la musica.
    • English equivalent: It isn’t what you do, but the best way that you simply do it; Halls don’t grace males, it’s males that grace halls.
    • “Everybody wants something, but they don’t know how to ask for it.”
    • Tony Gayon, Homicide by Numbers (2002)
    • Emanuel Strauss (11 January 2013). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 802. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6.
  • È meglio cader dalla finestra che dal tetto.
    • Translation: It’s higher to fall from the window than from the roof.
    • English equal: Choose the lesser of two evils.
    • Which means: “If you are forced to choose between two options, both of which are undesirable, all you can do is choose the one that is less undesirable than the other.”
    • Source for which means of English equal: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Information on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 42. ISBN 978-Zero-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 3 August 2013.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 5.
  • È meglio che si dica ‘qui il tale fuggi’ che ‘qui il tale mori’.
    • Translation: It’s higher to say “here he ran” than “here he died”.
    • English equivalent: He who fights and runs away might stay to battle another day.
    • Which means: “It is wiser to withdraw from a situation that you cannot win than to go on fighting and lose – by a strategic retreat you can return to the battle or argument with renewed energy at a later date.”
    • Supply for which means of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Details on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 123. ISBN 978-Zero-8160-6673-5.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 702. ISBN 0415096243.
  • È meglio un presente che due futuri.
    • Translation: Better one now, than two sooner or later.
    • English equivalent: One at this time is value two tomorrows.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1137. ISBN 0415096243.
  • È meglio star solo che mal accompagnato.
    • Translation: It’s better to be alone than to be in dangerous firm.
    • English equal: Better be alone than in dangerous firm.
    • Source for proverb: Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 572. ISBN 0415096243.
  • È sempre buono avere due corde per un arco.
    • English equal: Good driving at two anchors, males have advised, for if the one fails, the other might hold.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 879. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Egli e mal sordo che non vuol udire.
    • English equal: None so deaf as those who won’t hear.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1110. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Egli fa roba sull’ acqua.
  • Esperienza, madre di scienza.
    • English equal: Expertise is the mom of wisdom.
    • “Experience is what you get when you did not get what you wanted.”
    • Randy Pausch, The Last Lecture (2007)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 808. ISBN 0415096243.

F

  • Far d’una mosca un elefante.
    • English equal: Don’t make a mountain out of a molehill.
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations (W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue) ed.). p. 58.
  • Finché c’è vita c’è speranza.
    • Translation: “Where there’s life, there’s hope.”
    • Soriano (2010). Finchéc’èvita non c’èsperanza. Diario aforistico 2003-2009. Kimerik. pp. 102. ISBN 8860965586.
  • Fare il passo più lungo della gamba.
    • English equal: Don’t have too many irons in the hearth.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 977. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Destiny quello che dico e non quel che faccio.
    • English equal: Preachers say: do as I say, not as i do.
    • Attainable interpretation: One shouldn’t reprimand those that are younger than himself, when they are merely doing what he does or has executed.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 706. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Fortuna i forti aiuta, e i timidi rifiuta.
  • Tra il dire e il fare c’è di mezzo il mare.
    • Translation: “An ocean lies between what is said and what is done.”
    • English equivalent: “Easier said than done.”
    • Kinder, Savini (2004). Utilizing Italian: A Guide to Modern Usage. Cambridge University Press. p. 186. ISBN 0521485568.
  • Fuggi il piacer presente, che accena dolor futuro.
    • Translation: Skip the enjoyment that you will remorse.
    • English equal: Avoid the pleasure which can chew tomorrow.
    • Ward, Caroline (1842). Nationwide proverbs in the principal languages of Europe. J.W. Parker. p. 11.

G

  • Gettar le margherite si porei.
  • Granata nuova scopa bene tre giorni.
    • English equal: New brooms sweep clean.
    • Which means: Newcomers are probably the most formidable.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1103. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Guarda innanzi che tu salti.
    • English equivalent: Look before you leap.
    • “The man who thinks before he acts, is most likely to act with discretion, and have no future cause to repent of his conduct; but he who acts blindly, without any foresight, will probably suffer for his rashness.”
    • Trusler, John (1790). Proverbs exemplified, and illustrated by footage from real life. p. 115.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1069. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Guardatevi dai falsi profeti.
    • English equal: Watch out for the false prophets, who come to you in sheep’s clothes, and inwardly are ravening wolves.
    • Which means: The seemingly most respectable individuals are quiet typically scoundrels; Evil individuals typically act innocently.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 170. ISBN 0415160502.

I

  • I buoni nuotatori al fin si affogano.
    • English equal: Good swimmers are often drowned.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 879. ISBN 0415096243.
  • I fatti son femmine, e le parole maschi.
    • English equal: Deeds are fruits, words are but leaves.
    • “It is not so much what you believe in that matters, as the way in which you believe it and proceed to translate that belief into action.”
    • Lin Yutang, The Significance of Dwelling (1937)
    • Ward, Caroline (1842). Nationwide proverbs in the principal languages of Europe. J.W. Parker. p. 26.
  • I fratelli uniti tra loro formano un fascio che pùo resistere agli sforzi più robusti.
    • English equal: United we stand, divided we fall; Union is power.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 79. ISBN 0415096243.
  • I ladri grandi fanno impiccare i piccolo.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1086. ISBN 0415096243.
  • I frutti proibiti sono i più dolci.
  • I pensieri fanno mettere i peli canuti.
    • Translation: Sorrow makes grey hairs before the time.
    • English equivalent: Fretting cares make gray hairs.
    • Which means: Worrying is a adverse exercise that may age you prematurely.
    • Supply for proverb: Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 631. ISBN 0415096243.
  • I primi saranno gli ultimi.
    • English equal: The last can be first, and the primary last.
    • Which means: Those who humbly serve the Lord will probably be rewarded, and people who are boastful shall be humbled.; Humbleness is a advantage, delight is a sin.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1085. ISBN 0415096243.
  • I topi abbandonano la nave che affonda.
    • English equal: Rats desert a sinking ship.
    • Which means: A corporation or chief in hassle will shortly be abandoned.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1150. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Il bugiardo deve avere buona memoria .
    • English equivalent: A liar ought to have a great reminiscence.
    • Which means: “Liars must remember the untruths they have told, to avoid contradicting themselves at some later date.”
    • Supply for which means of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Details on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 167. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). “274”. Dictionary of European Proverbs. I. Routledge. p. 257. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7. Retrieved on 24 November 2013.
  • Il buon sangue giammai non può mentire.
  • Il dolce far niente.
    • Translation: The sweet do nothing.
    • Reported as “a well known Italian proverb” in Bartlett’s Acquainted Quotations, 10th ed. (1919).
  • Il cane abbaia, ma la carovana passa.
    • Translation: The canine bark but the caravan passes on.
    • Which means: Let the world say what it’s going to.
    • Supply: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 340. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Il castigo puo differirsi ma si toglie.
    • English equivalent: Punishment is lame however it comes.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 682. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Il cuor non spaglia.
    • English equal: The guts sees farther than the top.
    • “Trust your instincts.”
    • Julia Louis-Dreyfus, How She Broke the Seinfeld Curse, Redbook Magazine (2010)
  • Il denaro è fatto per spendere.
    • Translation: The hidden issues of wisdom and a treasure that isn’t seen, what revenue is in them each?
    • English equivalent: Money is there to be spent.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1013. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Il denaro non fa la felicità.
    • Translation: Wealth doesn’t deliver happiness.
    • Observe: One other option to phrase this is by this quote:

“Nobody – not a single individual out of a thousand [elderly interviewed because of their wisdom expertise] – stated that to be completely happy it is best to attempt to work as onerous as you’ll be able to to earn cash to purchase the belongings you need.

Nobody – not a single individual –– stated it’s essential to be no less than as rich because the individuals around you, and if in case you have more than they do it’s actual success.

Nobody – not a single individual –– stated you must select your work based mostly on your desired future earning power.”

  • From, Brody, Jane (2011). 30 Lessons for Dwelling. Penguin Group. p. 57. ISBN 1594630844.
    • English equivalent: Wealth not often brings happiness.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 670. ISBN 0415096243.
  • ‘’Il faut prendre le bénéfice avec les expenses.’’
    • English equivalent: Beggars can’t be choosers.
    • We should settle for with gratitude and without grievance what we’re given once we should not have the means or alternative to offer

ourselves with one thing better.”

  • Il frutto cade non lontano dall’albero.
    • English equivalent: The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    • Which means: Youngsters observe day by day and — in their behaviour — typically comply with the example of their mother and father.
    • Source for proverbs and which means: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 259. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.
  • Il male vien a cavallo e se ne va a piedi.
    • English equivalent: “Misfortune comes on horseback and goes away on foot.”
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 65. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Il meglio ricolga il peggio.
    • English equivalent: Dangerous is the only option.
    • “I always search good in bad. l also search bad in good.”
    • Vennu Malesh, It’s My Life (2012)
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 17.
  • Il mondo è ingrato
    • Translation: Ingratitude is the world’s reward.
    • Supply: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 55. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Il mondo è fatto a scale, chi Ie scende, e chi le sale.
  • In bocca chiusa non entrò mai mosca.
    • Translation: Into a closed mouth no flies ever entered.
    • English equal: An in depth mouth catches no flies.
    • Which means: It is clever not to converse when it isn’t vital.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 73. ISBN 0415096243.
  • In cento anni o cento mesi, l’acqua torna a’ suoi paesi.
    • Translation: In a hundred years or in a hundred months, the water doesn’t come again to it’s source.
    • English equivalent: It should all be the identical 100 years therefore.
    • Which means: So what in the event you embarrass your self?
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 48.
  • In gioventù devi acquistare, quel che in vecchiaia può giovare.
    • English equivalent: Diligent youth makes straightforward age.
    • Which means: When you reside your youth years diligently, it should prevent from regret when you’re previous. That’s, you deal with your health and do belongings you like that nearly solely younger individuals can do.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 701. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Il più forte ha sempre ragione.
    • English equivalent: Accusing is proving, when malice and drive sit judges; The wolf finds a cause for taking the lamb
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 68. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Il piu povero che sia in terra è l’avaro.
    • English equal: The covetous man is sweet to none and worst to himself.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 83. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Il primo amore non si scorda mai.
    • English equivalent: Real love never grows previous.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1107. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Il remedio e peggio del male
    • English equal: The remedy is usually worse than the illness; Burn not your home to rid it off the mouse.
    • Which means: The effect of a remedy or bodily enhancement – whether pharmaceutical or not, whether a family treatment or professional-ordained – is usually worse than what it was meant to remedy or alleviate.
    • Hulme, F. Edward (2003). Proverb Lore (Reimpresa ed.). Kessinger Publishing. p. 109. ISBN 0766146529.
  • Il secondo pensiero è il migliore.
  • Il serpe tra’ fiori e l’erba giace.
    • English equal: Look before you leap, for snakes among sweet flowers do creep.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1070. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Il tuo nemico è quello dell’area tua.
    • Translation: These are dangerous canine who chew their own individuals.
    • English equal: Don’t wash your dirty linen in public; It is an sick fowl that fouls its own nest.
    • Which means: Don’t converse in public of disagreeable personal affairs; Don’t converse unwell of your self and the teams you belong to.
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations (W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue) ed.). p. 45.
  • In casa di calzolaio non si hanno scarpe.
    • Translation: In the home of the shoemaker there are not any footwear.
    • English equivalents: Cobblers’ youngsters are worst shod; The shoemaker goes barefoot. The shoemaker’s wife and the smith’s horse have not footwear.
    • Which means: “Working hard for others one may neglect one’s own needs or the needs of those closest to him.”
    • Supply for which means of English equal: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 65. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 661. ISBN 0415096243.
  • In terra di ciechi, beato a chi ha un occhio.
  • Intendere è potere.
    • English equal: Learning is the eye of the thoughts.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 149. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Ipanni rifanno le stanghe.

L

  • La pigrizia è la chiave della povertà.
    • English equivalent: Poverty is the reward of idleness.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1146. ISBN 0415096243.
  • L’onestà è la migliore politica.
    • English equal: Honesty is one of the best coverage.
    • Which means: “Being honest or telling the truth is always the wisest course of action.”
    • Supply for which means of English equal: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Details on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 128. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. X.
  • L’invidia è annessa alla felicità.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). “1292”. Dictionary of European proverbs. II. Routledge. p. 1008. ISBN 0415096243.
  • L’invidia non morÌ mai.
    • English equal: Envy takes no vacation.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 767. ISBN 0415096243.
  • L’uomo si giudica mal alla cerca.
    • English equivalent: Decide not a person and issues at first sight.
    • “No good Book, or good thing of any sort, shows its best face at first.”
    • Thomas Carlyle, Essays, “Novalis” (1829)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 713. ISBN 0415096243.
  • La galline fanno l’uova dal becco.
    • English equivalent: It’s by the top that the cow provides the milk.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1039. ISBN 0415096243.
  • La gatta frettolosa ha fatto i gattini ciechi.
    • English equal: The hasty bitch bringeth forth blind whelps.
    • Meaning_ “Things done in haste tend to produce poor results.”
    • Source for which means of English equal: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Information on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 115. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 1080. ISBN 0415096243.
  • La maggior’ sventura o ventura dell’uomo è la moglie.
    • English equivalents: Select a wife slightly by your ear than your eye; A person’s greatest fortune or his worst is a wife.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 65. ISBN 0415096243.
  • La lepre mal si prende al suono di tamburo.
    • English equivalent: Drumming isn’t the best way to catch a hare.
    • “When people are just, they need friendship in addition.”
    • Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (c. 325 BC), Ebook VIII, 1155.a26
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 754. ISBN 0415096243.
  • La maggior’ sventura o ventura dell’uomo è la moglie.
    • English equal: A cheerful wife is the spice of life.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 20. ISBN 0415160502.
  • La miglior difesa è l’attacco.
    • Translation: The perfect protection is attack.
    • English equal: The most effective defence is an effective offence.
    • Which means: “You are more likely to win if you take the initiative and make an attack rather than preparing to defend yourself.”
    • Source for which means: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Details on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 21. ISBN 978-Zero-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 30 June 2013.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 518. ISBN 0415096243.
  • La pigrizia è la chiave della povertà.
  • La roba di mal acquisto se la porta il vento.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 762. ISBN 0415096243.
  • La più lunga strada è la più prossima a casa.
    • English equal: The highway isn’t about.
    • Strauss (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 394. ISBN 0415160502.
  • La storia si ripete.
    • English equivalent: One thing that has occurred once can occur once more.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 977. ISBN 0415096243.
  • La superbia viene davanti alla rovina.
    • Translation: Delight comes earlier than fall.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 1148. ISBN 0415096243.
  • La varietà piace.
    • English equal: Variety is the spice of life.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 89. ISBN 0415160502.
  • La volpe in vicinato non fa mai danno
    • English equivalent: A crafty fox never preys close to his den.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 25. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Loda il mare e tienti alla terra.
    • English equivalent: Praise the sea, however carry on land.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 661. ISBN 0415096243.

M

  • Mal comune, mezzo gaudio.
    • English equivalent: “Misery loves company.”
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 187. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Mal si mangia le lepre, se prima non si piglia.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 683. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Male prevede chi non provvede.
    • English equivalent: God helps those that assist themselves.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 732. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Medico, cura te stesso!
    • English equal: Physician, heal your self!
    • Which means: Don’t right different’s faults; right your personal faults as an alternative.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1142. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Meglio è tornar indietro, che correr male avanti.
    • Translation: Higher to turn back, than to painfully transfer ahead.
    • English equivalent: Higher go about than fall into the ditch.
    • Which means: Minimize your losses.
    • Ward, Caroline (1842). National proverbs in the principal languages of Europe. J.W. Parker. p. 11.
  • Meglio tardi che mai.
    • English equal: Better late than by no means.
    • Which means: “It is better that somebody arrives or something happens later than expected or desired, than not at all.”
    • Supply for which means: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Details on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 25. ISBN 978-Zero-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 30 June 2013.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 584. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Meglio prevedere che provvedere.
    • Translation: It is better to stop than to remedy.
    • English equivalent: An oz of preventions is best than a pound of remedy.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 332. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Mettere il carro innanzi ai buoi.
    • Translation: To set the cart before the horse.
    • English equal: Don’t put the cart before the horse.
    • Which means: “It is important to do things in the right or natural order.”
    • Supply for which means of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Details on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 63. ISBN 978-Zero-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 18 August 2013.
    • Ward, Caroline (1842). Nationwide proverbs in the principal languages of Europe. J.W. Parker. p. 106.
  • Molta paglia, poco grano.
    • Translation and English equal: Nice cry and little wool.
    • Which means: “Much ado about nothing.”
    • Supply for which means of English equal: Keating, Walter (1859). Proverbs of All Nations. W. Kent & Firm (late D. Bogue). p. 128.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). “178”. Dictionary of European Proverbs. I. Routledge. p. 173. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7.
  • Muove la coda il cane, non per te, ma per il pane.
    • English equivalent: He who acts pleasant does not seek your affection, but a selected thing from you.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 710. ISBN 0415096243.

N

  • Ne uccide più la gola che la spada.
    • English equal: Gluttony kills more than the sword.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 864. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Neccessità non ha legge.
    • Translation: Necessity is aware of no regulation.
    • English equivalent: Necessity has no regulation..
    • Which means: It’s acceptable to break rules in occasions of want.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 60.
  • Nel dubbio, astieniti.
    • English equal: When unsure, depart it out.
    • Which means: “If you are unsure what to do, it is best to do nothing at all.”
    • Source for which means of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Details on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 296. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 54. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Nella felicità ragione; nell’infelicità pazienza.
    • English equal: If fortune favours, beware of being exalted; if fortune thunders, watch out for being overwhelmed.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1001. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Nemico diviso, mezzo vinto.
    • Translation: Enemy divided, half gained.
    • English equal: Divide and conquer.
    • Which means: “The best way to conquer or control a group of people is by encouraging them to fight among themselves rather than allowing them to unite in opposition to the ruling authority.”
    • Source for which means of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Information on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 57. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 13 August 2013.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). “823”. Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6.
  • Nessun sente da che parte preme la scarpa, se non chi se la calza.
    • English equal: Needs must when the devil drives.
    • Which means: It’s acceptable to interrupt guidelines in occasions of need.
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 60.
  • Nessun sente da che parte preme la scarpa, se non chi se la calza.
  • Nessuno è indispensable.
    • English equal: No man is indispensable.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 319. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Niente di nuovo sotto il sole.
    • English equal: Nothing is new.
    • Which means: Completely every part has been achieved before.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1114. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Night time is the mom of ideas.
    • English equal: Take counsel of one’s pillow.
    • Word: Specified as an Italian proverb in the supply.
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations (W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue) ed.). p. 63.
  • Non bisogna fare le cose a metà.
    • English equivalent: If a job is value doing, it’s value doing nicely.
    • Runge, Martin (2000). Geriatrische Rehabilitation im Therapeutischen Staff (2 ed.). Georg Thieme Verlag. p. 282. ISBN 3131023821.
  • Non bisogna puntare tutto sulla stessa carta.
    • English equal: “Don’t put all your eggs in the same basket.”
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 715. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Non c’è avere che voglia sapere.
    • English equal: ”A superb thoughts possess a kingdom.”
    • Which means: Materials belongings are fleeting, however mental belongings will principally stay with you for the remainder of your life. Subsequently, intellectual belongings are far more value than materials ones.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 58. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Non c’è due senza tre.
    • English equal: All good things are three.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 80. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Non dare consigli a chi non li chiede.
    • English equivalent: Give neither salt nor counsel until you’re asked for it.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 661. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Non doe seguir amor chi non ha valore.
  • Non fu mai gloria senza invidia.
    • English equal: Envy all the time shooteth at a excessive mark.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 766. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Non ha il dolce a caro, chi provato non ha l’amaro.
    • Translation: To taste the candy, you need to style the bitter.
    • English equal: No pain, no achieve; Nothing ventured, nothing gained.
    • Which means: The place there isn’t a adversity of some type there’s seldom something to win; No or little adversity is a sign that fortune has forgotten you.
    • Ward, Caroline (1842). National proverbs within the principal languages of Europe. J.W. Parker. p. 33.
  • Non ricordar il capestro, in casa dell’impiccato.
    • Translation: In the house of the hanged man, point out not the rope.
    • English equal: Identify not a rope in his home who hanged himself.
    • Ward, Caroline (1842). Nationwide proverbs in the principal languages of Europe. J.W. Parker. p. 86.
  • Non si cube mai tanto una cosa che non sia qualche cosa
    • English equivalent: “The voice of the people is the voice of god.”
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1164. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Non si è mai troppo prudenti.
    • English equivalent: Better protected than sorry.
    • Which means: Issues that has occurred will happen again. Spiritual myths for instance, which are allegorical, will per definition reoccur.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 881. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Non si è mai troppo prudenti.
    • Translation: One can by no means be too careful.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1087. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Non si puo fare stringhe della propria pelle.
    • English equivalent: Don’t burn the candles at both ends.
    • Which means: Don’t wake up early within the morning and keep up late into the evening as properly.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1137. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Non si può cavar sangue dalla rapa.
    • English equivalent: You’ll be able to’t milk a bull.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1040. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Non si serra mai una porta che non se n’apra un’altra.
    • English equivalent: When one door closes one other opens.
    • Which means: “When baffled in one direction a man of energy will not despair, but will find another way to his object.”
    • Source for which means of English equivalent: Proverbs of All Nations. W. Kent & Company (late D. Bogue). 1859. p. 67.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 845. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Non si può aver il miele senza la pecchie.
    • English equal: Honey is nice, however the bees sting.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 837. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Non si tosto si fa un tempio a Dio come il diavolo ci fabrica una capella appresso.
    • English equivalent: Where god has a church the satan may have his chapel.
    • “Very seldom does any good thing arise but there comes an ugly phantom of a caricature of it.”
    • Supply for which means: Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations (W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue) ed.). p. 130.
    • Supply for proverb: Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 874. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Non tutte le ciambelle riescono col buco.
    • English equivalent: Not all truths are correct to be informed.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1111. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Non v’ha libro sí cattivo che non abbia qualcosa di buono.
    • English equivalent: No ebook was so dangerous, but some good could be obtained out of it.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1104. ISBN 0415096243.
  • ‘’Nu mesura pe altii cu palma ta.’’
    • English equal: Don’t decide others by your personal yardstick.
    • “l often went fishing up in Maine during the summer. Personally I am very fond of strawberries and cream, but I have found that for some strange reason fish prefer worms.”
    • Dale Carnegie, Methods to win buddies and influence individuals (1933)
    • cite guide | last1 = Mawr | first = E.B. | yr = 1885 | title = Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages |url=http://editura.mttlc.ro/carti/mawr-analogous-proverbs.pdf | web page
  • Nutritura passa natura.
    • English equal: Nature is beyond all educating.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 764. ISBN 0415096243.

O

  • Odi, veti et tace, se voi vivir in pace.
    • English equivalent: Hold your mouth shut and your ears open.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 160. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Oggi a me, domani a te.
    • Translation: Right now for me, and tomorrow for you.
    • English equal: In the present day me, tomorrow thee.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1038. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Ogni cosa ha cagione.
    • Translation: All the things has a cause.
    • English equivalent: Each why has a wherefore.
    • Which means: “Everything has an underlying reason.”
    • Supply for which means of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Information on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 80. ISBN 978-Zero-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 22 September 2013.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 765. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Ogni cuffia è buone por Ie natte.
  • Ogni cosa si compra a prezzo.
    • Translation: The whole lot you purchase at the worth.
    • English equal: You don’t get something for nothing.
    • Which means: “Everything has to be paid for, directly or indirectly, in money or in kind.”
    • Source for which means of English equal: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Information on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 314. ISBN 978-Zero-8160-6673-5.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 799. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Ogni paese al valent’uomo è patria.
    • English equivalent: Great minds agree.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 882. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Ogni regola ha la sua eccezione.
    • Translation: No rules with out exceptions.
    • English equivalent: There isn’t any rule with out an exception.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1174. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Ogni verità non è a dire.
    • English equal: All truths are not to be informed.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 282. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Ognun si pari le mosche con la sua coda.
    • English equivalent: Each hen should hatch its own eggs.
    • Which means: We must rely upon ourselves: financially and otherwhise.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 777. ISBN 0415096243.

P

  • Pazzo chi perde il volo per lo sbalzo.
    • English equivalent: One should step again to take a very good leap.
    • “Information processing keeps going on even when we are not aware of it, even while we are asleep.”
    • Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, Creativity: Move and the Psychology of Discovery and Invention (1997)
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 62.
  • Per gnente l’orbo no canta.
    • English equivalent: You’ll be able to’t get one thing for nothing.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 799. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Perdere il trotto per l’ambiadura.
  • Paese che vai, usanze che trovi.
    • English equal: When in Rome, do as the Romans do.
    • Dahlke (2008). Cibo, peso e psiche. Interpretazione psicosomatica dei disturbi alimentari. Tecniche Nuove. p. 15. ISBN 8848118119.
  • Più grande la compagnia, più ci si diverte.
    • English equivalent: The more the merrier.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1094. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Poeta si nasce, oratore si diventa.
    • English equal: Poets are born, however orators are educated.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 331. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Presto matura, presto marcio.
    • English equivalent: Early ripe, early rotten.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 758. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Prudenza è madre di sicurezza.
    • English equivalent: Warning is the mother or father of security.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). “741”. Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. II. Routledge. p. 645. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6.

R

  • Journey bene chi journey ultimo.

Q

  • Quale il padre story il figlio.
    • Translation: Such father, such son.
    • English equivalent: Like father, like son.
    • Which means: Sons might look and behave like their fathers. This is because of inheritance and the example noticed intently and day by day.
    • Source for which means and proverb: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.
  • Quand’un è per terra, ognun grida: dagli, dagli!.
    • English equivalent: Don’t hit a person when he is down.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 730. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Quando l’amico chiede, non v’è domani.
    • Translation: When a good friend asks, there isn’t a tomorrow.
    • English equal: When thy pal asks, let there be no to-morrow.
    • Ward, Caroline (1842). Nationwide proverbs in the principal languages of Europe. J.W. Parker. p. 151.
  • Quando la testa duole tutte le membra languono.
    • Translation: When the top aches all of the members languish.
    • English equivalent: When the top is sick, the entire physique is sick.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1117. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Quando tutti dicono ubriaco, va’ a dormire (letto).
    • English equal: When all men say you’re an ass it is time to bray.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1221. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Quel che ciondola non cade.
    • Translation: All that dangles does not fall.
    • English equivalent: All is just not misplaced that is in peril.
    • Which means: Alltough your enterprise is in peril, it does not necessarily mean you’re failing.
    • Ward, Caroline (1842). Nationwide proverbs in the principal languages of Europe. J.W. Parker. p. 11.
  • Quel che ciondola, non cade.
  • Quel che pare burla, ben sovente è vero.
    • English equal: Many a real words are spoken in jest.
    • “A joke’s a very serious thing.”
    • Charles Churchill, The Ghost (1763), guide iv, line 1386
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations. W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue). p. 57.

S

  • Scusa non richiesta, accusa manifesta.
    • English equivalent: A responsible conscience needs no accuser.
    • Which means: “People who know they have done wrong reveal their guilt by the things they say or the way they interpret what other people say.”
    • Source for which means of English equal: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Information on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 112. ISBN 978-Zero-8160-6673-5.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). “243”. Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 227. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6.
  • Se la montagna non va da Maometto, Maometto viene alla montagna.
    • Translation: If the mountain gained’t come to Mohammed, Mohammed should come to the mountain.
    • English equivalent: If the mountain won’t come to Mohammed, Mohammed should go to the mountain.
    • Which means: “If you cannot get what you want, you must adapt yourself to the circumstances or adopt a different approach.”
    • Supply for which means of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Information on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 135. ISBN 978-Zero-8160-6673-5.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 1006. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Se piovesse maccheroni, che bel tempo pei ghiottoni.
    • English equivalent: If the sky falls, we will catch larks.
    • “The Lark is a lofty Bird, and foars perhaps as high as any of the Inhabitants of the airy Regions; and if there be no other way of coming at them, till the Sky falling down on their Heads beats them down into our Hands, we shall be little the better for ’em. This Proverb is ufually apply’d to Such Perfons who buoy themfelves up with vain Hopes, but in Embryo, ill conceived … to laft till their Accomplifhment.” says Mr. Bailey. He considerably unpedagogically remarks that “A lark is better than a kite” for “a little which is good, is better than a great deal of that which is good for nothing.”
    • Divers Proverbs with Their Explication & Illustration, Nathan Bailey, 1721 [1]
    • Caroline Ward (1842). National Proverbs in the Principal Languages of Europe. J.W. Parker. p. 65.
  • Se vende i suoi figli per il formaggio non puo riaverli dopo aver mangiato la pizza.
    • Translation: Should you promote your youngsters for cheese, you possibly can’t get them again after you’ve eaten the pizza.
    • English equal: What is completed, is completed.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1018. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Secondo la misura che farai, misurator ancor sarai.
    • English equal: Whatever measure you deal out to others can be dealt back to you.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1219. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Secondo la paga, il lavoro.
    • Translation: What pay, such work.
    • English equal: You get what you pay for.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 494. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Senza tentazioni, senza onore.
    • Translation: The place there isn’t any temptation there isn’t a glory.
    • English equal: Without temptation there isn’t any victory.
    • Which means: Not being tempted is an indication that fortune has forgotten you.
    • Ward, Caroline (1842). National proverbs in the principal languages of Europe. J.W. Parker. p. 156.
  • Si dice sempre il lupo più grande che non è.
    • Translation: The wolf is made greater than it’s.
    • English equal: A story never loses within the telling.
    • Which means: Lying a bit of may make the story better.
    • Ward, Caroline (1842). National proverbs within the principal languages of Europe. J.W. Parker. p. 7.
  • Si mira piu dell’affetto che all’effetto.
    • Translation: The goal is more to the effect of affection.
    • English equivalent: Take the desire for the deed.
    • Which means: Take a look at the properly meant effort, and never its results.
    • Ward, Caroline (1842). Nationwide proverbs in the principal languages of Europe. J.W. Parker. p. 158.
  • Spazzatoio nuovo spazza ben la casa. (Italian)
    • Translation: A new broom sweeps properly the house.
    • English equal: A brand new broome sweepeth cleane.
    • Which means: “We should never use an old tool when the extra labor in consequence costs more than a new one. Thousands wear out their lives and waste their time merely by the use of dull and unsuitable instruments.”
    • Alternate which means: “We often apply it to exchanges among servants, clerks, or any persons employed, whose service, at first, in any new place, is very good, both efficient and faithful; but very soon, when all the new circumstances have lost their novelty, and all their curiosity has ceased, they naturally fall into their former and habitual slackness.”
    • Source for which means: Porter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order …. Munroe and Firm. p. 38.
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). “12”. European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese language and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. 92. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.

T

  • Tal madre, tal figlia .
    • Translation: Such mother, such daughter.
    • English equivalent: Like mom, like daughter.
    • Which means: Daughters might look and behave like their moms. This is due to inheritance and the example noticed intently and infrequently.
    • Source for which means and proverb: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7.
  • Tal mano si bacia che si vorrebbe veder tagliata.
    • English equivalent: Many kiss the hand they want to reduce off.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1084. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Tal sonata, tal ballata.
    • English equivalent: Just as one calls into the forest, so it echoes back.
    • Which means: Do not anticipate pleasant reply when being obnoxious.
    • Which means: Dangerous language might produce other causes than innate dangerous character.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 139. ISBN 0415160502.
  • Tra/fra moglie e marito non ci mettere il dito.
    • Translation: Between wife and husband don’t put a finger.
    • English equal: Don’t go between the tree and the bark.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 728. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Tutto è bene quel che riesce bene.
  • Tutte le strade conducono a Roma.

U

  • Un nemico è troppo o cento amici non bastano.
    • English equivalent: Do not assume that one enemy is insignificant, or that a thousand associates are too many.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 718. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Uno semina, l’altro raccoglie.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Quantity 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1134. ISBN 0415096243.
  • Uomo avvisato è mezzo salvato.
    • English equal: Forewarned, forearmed.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). “401”. Dictionary of European Proverbs. I. Routledge. p. 364. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7.

V

  • Val meglio essere matti in compagnia che savi da soli.
    • English equal: Better foolish by all than clever by your self.
    • Emanuel Strauss. “70”. Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs.